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UF 200 Themes

All sections of UF 200 explore the common theme, “With Liberty and Justice for All.”  All sections have a similar workload. And all sections focus on building student skills in the areas of writing, ethics, diversity, and internationalization.

However, since our faculty come from a variety of disciplines across the humanities and social sciences, each instructor explores our common theme in a different way, bringing a different disciplinary expertise and perspective to the civic engagement and ethics focus of UF 200. Explore the documents and table below to learn more about individual section topics.

Summer 2017 INFORMATION
Download the flyer below for a summary of Summer 2017 UF 200 course topics and instructors. You can also search the table at the bottom of this page for additional information about each class.

Click Here for Summer 2017 FLYER

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Spring 2017 INFORMATION
Download the flyer below for a summary of Spring 2017 UF 200 course topics and instructors. You can also search the table at the bottom of this page for additional information about each class.

CLICK HERE FOR Spring 2017 FLYER

Click for Spring 2017 Flyer

SERVICE LEARNING OPTIONS:
The UF 200 sections taught by instructors Sara Fry, Lisa Meierotto, and Margaret Sass have service learning options. Contact one of these instructors to learn more about taking UF 200 as a service learning course.

SEARCH THE UF 200 SECTIONS LISTED IN THE TABLE BELOW:
Take a look at the table below to find a Fall section that aligns with your interests or seems compelling.

Seaclick name for syllabusrch by Faculty or by keyword/theme/big ideas: (hip-hop, self-expression, deviance, safety, justice, self-awareness, immigration, censorship, refugees, culture, courage, veterans, food, beliefs, human rights, childhood, inequality, intercultural, empathy, water, strangers, environment, inclusive, community, service, tolerance, openness, history, internet, freedom, religion, hospitality, identity)

 

FACULTYCLASS NUMBER DAY/TIMEDESCRIPTION
Benjamin Brandon12287

12293
TuTh
1:30-2:45 pm
TuTh
12:00-1:15 pm
The study of diversity requires that we go beyond our own society and civilization to different world-views: we will be exploring the beliefs of a variety of civilizations, including China, India, the Middle East, and Ancient Greece. Then we will study modern concepts of Diversity and Ethics, and explore the most pressing ethical issues of our own day and age.
Beret Norman11892MoWe
1:30-2:45 pm
Through the varying lenses of hip hop—including street murals, rap and poetry, we will examine contemporary issues of liberty and justice, power and empowerment, and self-expression from society’s “margins.” Interactive instruction includes 3 or more hours of community engagement, discussion, and presentations.
Caile Spear12285TuTh
10:30-11:45 am
Our service-learning class will explore the social determinants of health and how zipcode is a better predictor of our health vs our genetic code. The social determinants of health are the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, and the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life. We will explore how determinants of health play out in our personal lives, Idaho, different areas of the US and select countries. We will provide 15 hours of service at several agencies and see how the health of our community is impacted by various forces and systems.
Carissa Wolf11894ONLINEMass media is the glue that holds society together, shapes our social institutions and influences the way we think, feel and behave. This course focuses on media as a way to understand how we internalize thoughts and behavior and how this internalization shapes our ethical frameworks and impacts diversity and civic engagement.
Carrie Seymour12570
(Honors)
Tu
6:00-8:45 pm
Using theoretical ideas from the fields of philosophy, cultural anthropology, and sociology, combined with a discussion of relevant literature, film, and current events, we will explore the moral and ethical implications of how labels and stereotypes perpetuate outmoded or limited ideas about the nature of “acceptable” social traits and behaviors throughout the world. By looking at various “deviant” categories, and studying the social codes and contexts that inform the perception of those categories, we will then look at how the penal system in America is a shockingly large case study of how those perceptions play out for 2.26 million people every day.
Chris Klover12476

12286

12288
Tu
6:00-8:45 pm
TuTh
12:00-1:15 pm
TuTh
3:00-4:15 pm
Using the idea that safety is the right of every person, we will study the ethical and civic issues that result in the disabling of safety for diverse populations. As a learner-centered instructor, I provide opportunities for students to discover and process ideas and information about issues with global implications.
Christopher Michas12291TuTh
9:0-10:15 am
Coming Soon
Corinna Provant-Robishaw12284MoWe
4:30-5:45 pm
Living in an interconnected world, global knowledge is important in today's classroom and workplace. In this class, we will study different forms of oppression including, but not limited to Power and Privilege, Domestic Violence, Racism, Human Trafficking, and Gender Choices. We will focus on oppression through the global lens by reading "Half the Sky". Topics and ideas will relate through ethical frameworks and diverse perspectives surrounding complex global issues. Students are required to participate in a 2-3 hour service project.
Dora Ramirez12474TuTh
12:00-1:15 pm
Noam Chomsky wrote, “If we don’t believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don’t believe in it at all.” Thus, in a political and global world, censorship affects what we read, watch, listen to, and how we search the Internet. This course focuses on the censorship of literary texts, film, and music while examining the civic and ethical foundations of censorship cases in the United States.
Elena Tomorowitz13572MoWe
4:30-5:45 pm
We all want to be good people. But how? In this course, we’ll use ethical frameworks to explore forms of privilege and oppression and practice ways to respond in our own community. We’ll examine race, sex, religion, the environment, animal ethics and more in our quest to live ethically.
Elizabeth Cook12473

13342
MoWe
12:00-1:15 pm
MoWe
1:30-2:45 pm
Winston Churchill once stated, “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” This course melds moral philosophy, memoir, storytelling, personal responsibility and civic obligation as we examine moral courage through the lens of the veteran’s experience. Students will create independent field studies that draw on community engagement, the BSU Veteran’s Services Center and make use of Albertson Library’s Special Archives and the Vietnam Experience Collection.
Elizabeth Swearingen12297

12298

12299
MoWe
12:00-1:15 pm
MoWe
1:30-2:45 pm
MoWe
3:00-4:15 pm
This course builds on the framework of Paolo Friere’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed that demands a de-centered classroom in which students actively shape their own education. We explore the questions of civic engagement and ethical foundations through a social justice perspective that includes critical reflection, case studies, evidence based research paper, and group collaborative civic-engagement projects.
Erik Hadley12294TuTh
1:30-2:45 pm
This UF200 section analyzes how ethics, diversity and internationalization apply to food availability, production and quality. We will discuss the concept of ‘food justice’ and apply it to different ethical situations which reflect larger societal struggles regarding equality and rights, particularly in the categories of race, class and gender.
Francisco Salinas13346TuTh
4:30-5:45 pm
The question we explore in this course is: "Why do you believe what you believe about what is right and wrong and what are you going to do about it to make the world better?" We will do this through discussion, community engagement opportunities, reflective writing and individual and group essays and presentations.
Greg Heinzman11890

11993

12292
WeFr
9:00-10:15 am
WeFr
10:30-11:45 am
TuTh
10:30-11:45 am
How does my education affect my choices? How do my choices impact my community? A civic engagement project assisting refugees will encourage personal connections with a global community. The class arrives at the question “What Can We Do?” as citizens in a diverse democracy to creatively address human rights issues.
Jeremy Harper11891

13574
WeFr
10:30-11:45 am
ONLINE
This section is based around a simple question: “How and why does social inequality persist in the modern world?” We will examine multiple frameworks for understanding how inequality operates and is perpetuated, and we will use these frameworks to better understand wealth inequality, mass incarceration, fat shaming, immigration, and transphobia.
Jim Williams12963MoWe
3:00-4:15 pm
Coming Soon
Joachim Agamba15565MoWe
10:30-11:45 am
The course explores the phenomenon of diversity relative to questions and reflection on ethics. It examines what it means to be a citizen in the 21st Century.
Justin Vaughn12093TuTh
9:00-10:15 am
This course will utilize David Brooks's book, "The Road to Character." Students will read and discuss the book throughout the semester, and they will complete assignments that focus on character, morality, ethics, diversity, and internationalization.
Lisa Meierotto12295

15547

15546
TuTh
3:00-4:15 pm
ONLINE

ONLINE
Challenges students to think about the ethics of civic engagement: how and when should we get involved in advocating social/economic justice? We explore immigration policy and industrial food production as an opportunity for engagement with several important social issues. Students are required to participate in one 2-3 hour service project.
Marc Ruffinengo13343MoWe
3:00-4:15 pm
This course focuses on inequality in American primary education, specifically the often very poor conditions in many public schools. This includes everything from the availability of resources to the very conditions of the school infrastructure itself. Furthermore, inequality in education often perpetuates generational inequality. This creates social issues that society often attempts to "solve" using the Criminal Justice system once these children are adults. This course addresses important issues regarding how we can keep many people out of the Criminal Justice system by giving them tools to succeed earlier in life.
Margaret Sass11893WeFr
9:00-10:15 am
Intercultural knowledge and competence is important in today’s classroom and workplace. We will be exploring intercultural openness, intercultural curiosity, and intercultural empathy through self-awareness and worldview perspectives. Students will reflect and demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of intercultural context through different mediums such as group presentations, including the creation of an illustrated cultural diversity book for elementary students.

SL option: Students can visit and read their illustrated cultural diversity book to K-6 classrooms equating to 10 hours or more.
Mari Rice13345TuTh
10:30-11:45 am
“Is access to clean water and sanitation a human right?" "How do perceptions of water guide management?” This course approaches ethics, diversity, and civic engagement through the lens of water, considering global issues such as access to clean water, privatization, pollution, drought, and the impending water crisis. This is a highly interactive class that combines discussions, field trips, in-class projects, and service learning as we explore solutions to global water issues.
Refik Sadikovic13481ONLINE
This online section will provide opportunities for students to acquire the importance of building diverse and inclusive communities and their role in it, using ethical reasoning. Through the civic engagement project, students will apply principles of civic responsibility to analyze community issues and social policies of diverse populations (refugees, immigrants, etc.,) in our community by doing an “In-Depth Interview” assignment.
Sara Fry12291

13341
TuTh
9:00-10:15 am
TuTh
10:30-11:45 am
The question, "What motivates individuals to be actively involved in their local and/or global communities, making a difference in solidarity," guides our exploration of the contexts and ethics that inspire people to take action. Interactive instruction includes 3 or more hours of community engagement, discussion, and presentations.
Stephanie Spevak12289TuTh
4:30-5:45 pm
The class foundation is based on the saying “I pledge allegiance to ….” Then it branches into studying and understanding how we became a melting pot. We examine the ideas of Culture and how Culture has made the U.S. what it is today. We look at world changing events (Holocaust/WW2) “Human Rights” and focus on the importance of ethical leadership and decision making . Other areas of study include the great “ISMS” (Racism, Sexism, and Ageism). We also focus on the need for Diversity and making our country a place of Inclusion and Equality rather than exclusion, and analyze why Discrimination happens and how it can be prevented. I bring in guest speakers from the refugee foundation, an immigration attorney, and a speaker for LGBT from the Women’s Center, we visit the Anne Frank Memorial and engage in understanding how globally interdependent we are on one another not only in the U.S., but around the world…..and much, much more.
Stewart Gardner12296
(Honors)
TuTh
1:30-2:45 pm
"This class points toward the examined life. Consequential questions about our civic and ethical lives confront us: What makes a good society? What is the right way to live? The right way to approach those different from ourselves? To approach ethical questions? We will work to unearth and harmonize our implicit opinions on such questions by testing them against major ethical theories, and through experiential learning, conversation, reflection, and writing. This is critical thinking in the strongest sense, carrying criticism back to oneself, aiming at the reflexive ethic of continuous ethical questioning. Students are asked to develop a foundation of intellectual habits and a foundation in the literature."
Tiffany Seeley-Case15545ONLINEThis course will deconstruct the myth regarding the “freedom” of the internet. This intentionally online course will analyze the communication potential and peril of the internet as we look at issues of access, privacy, corporate control, and governmental regulation while, at the same time, work to recognize our own culpability and potential to affect positive, and much needed, change.
Tom Lobaugh13696TuTh
12:00-1:15 pm
For centuries global religions have practiced hospitality as way to identify their community by defining relationships with strangers. Through in-depth studies of ancient religious acts of being guest, host, alien, and friend you will discover your own personal understanding and responsibility of welcoming others in a selfie world.
Tony Songer & Karen Breitkreuz15710
(Study Abroad)
Tu
4:30-7:15 pm
A collaborative approach for addressing the global issues of poverty and inequity from the context of integrated health, business, education, and engineering systems. Requires an international, spring break service learning experience; acceptance into Study Abroad required. May be taken for credit for NURS or ENGR, but not both.